Delphos gown

The Delphos gown is a finely pleated silk dress first created in about 1907 by French designer Henriette Negrin and her husband, Mariano Fortuny y Madrazo (1871–1949).

Aquamanile

The Aquamanile (plural aquamanilia or simply aquamaniles; from lat. “aqua” – water and lat. “manus” – hand) – is a washstand, a ewer or jug-type vessel for washing hands in the form of an animal or human, sometimes several figures.

Jerkin

The Jerkin is a man’s short close-fitting jacket, without sleeves, worn over the doublet in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. A Jerkin is outerwear, often made of leather, velvet and other warm fabrics.

Little Black Dress

The Little Black Dress. (fr. La Petite robe noire) is a fashionable dress designed by Gabrielle Chanel in 1926. Many historians argue that before Chanel, only widows wore black and she revolutionized fashion.

Fleur d’oranger

The Fleur d’oranger (eng. The Orange blossom) – snow-white flowers of an orange tree; borrowed from French in many languages. The Fleur d’oranger is a traditional part of the bride’s wedding headpiece, such as a wreath, bridal bouquet, or other jewelry for the bride.

Pluderhosen

Pluderhosen or Upper hose (also Upper hosen) – short, baggy trousers for men made of fabric, usually velvet, with vertical slits showing the lining, hence they were also called “filled trousers”, chausse à la gigotte, chausse bouffante, etc.

Engageantes

Engageantes are false sleeves (or rather cuffs), worn with women’s clothing. It is difficult to say when the removable sleeves or cuffs appeared, but in the 17th century, lace trim on underwear was a very prominent feature of women’s and men’s fashion.

Mantua

The Mantua is style of gown, the late 17th – early 18th cent. Originally a loose gown, the later mantua was an overgown or robe typically worn over stays, stomacher and a co-ordinating petticoat.

Podstakannik

The Podstakannik (ru. подстаканник, literally “thing under the glass”), or tea glass holder, is a holder with a handle, most commonly made of metal that holds a drinking glass (stakan).

Epergne

Epergne is a type of table centerpiece that is usually made of silver or cristal but may be made of any metal or glass or porcelain.

Carnet de bal

The Carnet de bal, the programme du bal or the Dance card, is a little booklet, usually with a decorative cover, which lists dance titles, and provides a place for a lady to write in the name of the gentleman who promises to partner her for each specific dance.

Beach Pajamas

The Beach Pajamas are women’s summer leisure wear. Beach pajamas, which look like palazzo pants (wide-legged pants) with an attached sleeveless top, sometimes supplemented with a light robe or jacket.

Girdle

The Girdle is a form-fitting undergarment with garters. Distinguishes a Girdle from a Garter belt in that it is wide, reminiscent of a tight-fitting short skirt, hides the lower torso, extending below the hips, and worn often to shape or for support.

Chausses

Chausses (eng. Hose) are any of various styles of men’s clothing for the legs and lower body, worn from the Middle Ages through the 16th century, when the style fell out of use in favor of breeches and stockings.

Аllonge

The Аllonge (also Peruke) is a man’s headdress, wig with long wavy curls. Wigs in men’s fashion have been known for a long time, but they became ubiquitous in the middle of the 17th century.

Crinoline

A Crinoline is a stiff or structured petticoat designed to hold out a woman’s skirt, popular in the mid-19th century. Originally, crinoline was described as a stiff fabric made of horsehair (“crin”) and cotton or linen which was used to make underskirts and as a dress lining.

Tea gown

The Tea gown (also Tea dress) is type of lady’s home dress, loose-fitting dress, but sometimes belted. The lady wore a Tea gown at home, with her family and closest friends, but not for special occasions, for example, receiving guests or a dinner party.

Chantilly lace

The Chantilly lace (fr. La dentelle de Chantilly) is a handmade bobbin lace named after the city of Chantilly (France). In the 17th century, the Duchesse de Longueville organised the manufacture of lace at Chantilly.

Glasses

Types of glasses. The first eyeglasses were made in Northern Italy, most likely in Pisa, by about 1290 (or 1284). Initially, glasses were worn on the nose or held in the hand.

Swiss waist

The Swiss waist is fashionable accessory; bodice (corselet; corsage) or belt. The accessory was inspired by traditional Swiss women’s clothing. The Swiss waist was popular in the mid-19th century and returned for a second time as a belt at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Babette

The Babette is a hair style with a big bouffant (puff) on the top of the head. The hairstyle got its name from the film “Babette Goes to War”