Foot stoves

Foot stoves or footwarmers were perforated boxes, mostly heated by hot coals or stones in a special pot. Widely used in the Nordic countries such as Holland, Scandinavia and the British Isles in the 17th and 19th centuries.

Bowler hat

The Bowler hat (or Derby (United States); de. Melone; fr. Chapeau melon; it. Bombetta; nl. Bolhoed) is a headdress, a felt hat with a round crown, small, rounded brim, almost always black.

Hair coloring

Hair coloring has been known since very ancient times. There are many dyes, chemical reagents that change hair color. But now let’s talk about lightening hair in the Renaissance.

Flappers

Flappers are the ultra-trendy, fashionable, emancipated young women of the 1920s. These girls are the symbol of the Roaring Twenties. If we talk about the fashion of the 1920s, it is the flappers that personify this style.

Poke bonnet

The Poke bonnet is a type of headgear derived from a bonnet and a hat. Poke bonnet appears at the beginning of the 19th century, and comes from the fashionable Chapeau à la Paméla (hat with a brim, pressed with a ribbon or veil on the sides).

Sailor suit

Sailor suit or Sailor dress is a style in children’s and women’s clothing with special details inspired by sailors. The sailor suit came into children’s fashion in 1846, when the son of the British Queen Victoria was given a “little sailor”

Bliaud

The Bliaut or Bliaud is an overdress worn in the Middle Ages. The Bliaud has a lot of design options, but the main difference is the long gown with very thin and voluminous sleeves.

Suffragette

March 8 – International Women’s Day. It is based on suffragism, emancipation and various types of women’s struggle for rights. Under the name Suffragettes, we will bring together different types of women’s rights activists, although this applies to a greater extent to the history of the United States.

Garter

The Garter is a band worn to keep up a stocking, sock or chausses to the leg. Usually a garter is worn around the leg, but sometimes stockings are attached to other types of garments with garters (garter belt, corselet, sock braces, girdle, etc.).

Quilted wear

Quilted clothes has existed for a very long time, it is even impossible to say when it appeared. Until the 18th century, quilted garments were most commonly used as underwear, such as a petticoat or doublet.

Poulaines

The Poulaines (or Crakows; crackowes; pl. ciżemki; de. Schnabelschuh; sv. Snabelskor) are fashionable medieval shoes with very long toes. They were so named because the style was thought to have originated in Kraków, though the term “Poulaine”, as in souliers à la poulaine, “shoes in the Polish fashion”, referred to the long pointed beak of the shoe, not the shoe itself.

Giubberello

The Giubberello is a short sleeveless gown for men with open sides. This type of clothing was popular during the Renaissance in Italy (modern territory) in the 15th and early 16th centuries.

Robe à l’Anglaise

The Robe à l’Anglaise or the Close-bodied gown was a women’s fashion of the 18th century. This type of gown came into French fashion (and throughout the world, everywhere except English it calls “à l’Anglaise”) from England and featured a fitted bodice.

Doublet

The Doublet (fr. Pourpoint; ru. Дублет; de. Wams; es. Jubón; it. Farsetto) is a men’s snug-fitting jacket . The Doublet appears in the mid-14th century, and comes from the clothing worn by knights under armor.

Houppelande

The Houppelande (es. Hopalanda; it. Pellanda) is an overdress, with a long, full body and flaring sleeves, that was worn by both men and women in Europe in the late 14th century – 1430’s.

Zimarra

The Zimarra (fr. Marlotte; nl. and eng. Vlieger; es. Zamarra or Ropa) is a woman’s coat, overgown. The name “Zimarra” may have come from Spain or Portugal (Zamarra), later the same name was given to men’s religious clothing (eng.