The Bat

The fancy dress Bat became popular after the creation of the operetta Die Fledermaus (1874) by Johann Strauss II. In the operetta, the costume of the Bat is worn by a man, but the ladies were very fond of this “animal”.

Bowler hat

The Bowler hat (or Derby (United States); de. Melone; fr. Chapeau melon; it. Bombetta; nl. Bolhoed) is a headdress, a felt hat with a round crown, small, rounded brim, almost always black.

Poke bonnet

The Poke bonnet is a type of headgear derived from a bonnet and a hat. Poke bonnet appears at the beginning of the 19th century, and comes from the fashionable Chapeau à la Paméla (hat with a brim, pressed with a ribbon or veil on the sides).

Sailor suit

Sailor suit or Sailor dress is a style in children’s and women’s clothing with special details inspired by sailors. The sailor suit came into children’s fashion in 1846, when the son of the British Queen Victoria was given a “little sailor”

Garter

The Garter is a band worn to keep up a stocking, sock or chausses to the leg. Usually a garter is worn around the leg, but sometimes stockings are attached to other types of garments with garters (garter belt, corselet, sock braces, girdle, etc.).

Quilted wear

Quilted clothes has existed for a very long time, it is even impossible to say when it appeared. Until the 18th century, quilted garments were most commonly used as underwear, such as a petticoat or doublet.

Fleur d’oranger

The Fleur d’oranger (eng. The Orange blossom) – snow-white flowers of an orange tree; borrowed from French in many languages. The Fleur d’oranger is a traditional part of the bride’s wedding headpiece, such as a wreath, bridal bouquet, or other jewelry for the bride.

Engageantes

Engageantes are false sleeves (or rather cuffs), worn with women’s clothing. It is difficult to say when the removable sleeves or cuffs appeared, but in the 17th century, lace trim on underwear was a very prominent feature of women’s and men’s fashion.

Carnet de bal

The Carnet de bal, the programme du bal or the Dance card, is a little booklet, usually with a decorative cover, which lists dance titles, and provides a place for a lady to write in the name of the gentleman who promises to partner her for each specific dance.

Crinoline

A Crinoline is a stiff or structured petticoat designed to hold out a woman’s skirt, popular in the mid-19th century. Originally, crinoline was described as a stiff fabric made of horsehair (“crin”) and cotton or linen which was used to make underskirts and as a dress lining.

Tea gown

The Tea gown (also Tea dress) is type of lady’s home dress, loose-fitting dress, but sometimes belted. The lady wore a Tea gown at home, with her family and closest friends, but not for special occasions, for example, receiving guests or a dinner party.

Chantilly lace

The Chantilly lace (fr. La dentelle de Chantilly) is a handmade bobbin lace named after the city of Chantilly (France). In the 17th century, the Duchesse de Longueville organised the manufacture of lace at Chantilly.

Glasses

Types of glasses. The first eyeglasses were made in Northern Italy, most likely in Pisa, by about 1290 (or 1284). Initially, glasses were worn on the nose or held in the hand.

Swiss waist

The Swiss waist is fashionable accessory; bodice (corselet; corsage) or belt. The accessory was inspired by traditional Swiss women’s clothing. The Swiss waist was popular in the mid-19th century and returned for a second time as a belt at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.