Bliaud

The Bliaut or Bliaud is an overdress worn in the Middle Ages. The Bliaud has a lot of design options, but the main difference is the long gown with very thin and voluminous sleeves.

Poulaines

The Poulaines (or Crakows; crackowes; pl. ciżemki; de. Schnabelschuh; sv. Snabelskor) are fashionable medieval shoes with very long toes. They were so named because the style was thought to have originated in Kraków, though the term “Poulaine”, as in souliers à la poulaine, “shoes in the Polish fashion”, referred to the long pointed beak of the shoe, not the shoe itself.

Giubberello

The Giubberello is a short sleeveless gown for men with open sides. This type of clothing was popular during the Renaissance in Italy (modern territory) in the 15th and early 16th centuries.

Doublet

The Doublet (fr. Pourpoint; ru. Дублет; de. Wams; es. Jubón; it. Farsetto) is a men’s snug-fitting jacket . The Doublet appears in the mid-14th century, and comes from the clothing worn by knights under armor.

Jerkin

The Jerkin is a man’s short close-fitting jacket, without sleeves, worn over the doublet in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. A Jerkin is outerwear, often made of leather, velvet and other warm fabrics.

Pluderhosen

Pluderhosen or Upper hose (also Upper hosen) – short, baggy trousers for men made of fabric, usually velvet, with vertical slits showing the lining, hence they were also called “filled trousers”, chausse à la gigotte, chausse bouffante, etc.

Chausses

Chausses (eng. Hose) are any of various styles of men’s clothing for the legs and lower body, worn from the Middle Ages through the 16th century, when the style fell out of use in favor of breeches and stockings.

Аllonge

The Аllonge (also Peruke) is a man’s headdress, wig with long wavy curls. Wigs in men’s fashion have been known for a long time, but they became ubiquitous in the middle of the 17th century.

Oxford Bags

The Oxford Bags is a type of trousers with extra-wide legs. Oxford bags were a loose-fitting baggy form of trousers. In 1920’s – 1930’s they were popular among Oxford students.

Plus-fours

The Plus fours (or Plus-fours) are breeches or trousers that extend 4 inches (10 cm) below the knee (and thus four inches longer than traditional knickerbockers, hence the name).