Greaser

Greasers (from “grease” also “brilliantine”) are a youth subculture that emerged in the late 1940s and early 1960s from predominantly working class and lower-class teenagers and young adults in the United States.

Voilette

Voilette is an accessory, headpiece or part of a headdress made of tulle, lace or fine mesh. Voilette is a reduced variation of the veil, it does not serve any function, only decorative.

Autoped

Autoped is the first motorized scooter named after the company that registered the patent. The Autoped company produced from 1913 to 1921 in the USA;

Jodhpur and Breeches

Jodhpur pants (or trousers) and Riding Breeches are two types of pants that are similar in silhouette. Main feature: very wide, loose-fitting trousers in the hips and narrow from the knee down.

Overalls

Overalls (fr. Salopette; de. Latzhose; es. Overol; it. Salopette; pl. Ogrodniczki; ru. Комбинезон; pt. Jardineira; nl. Tuinbroek) are a type of garment that combines pants and a top.

Sunglasses

Sunglasses are an accessory that protects your eyes from the bright rays of the sun. The history of sunglasses goes back thousands of years, but it was not a fashion accessory, but a necessity.

The Bat

The fancy dress Bat became popular after the creation of the operetta Die Fledermaus (1874) by Johann Strauss II. In the operetta, the costume of the Bat is worn by a man, but the ladies were very fond of this “animal”.

Bowler hat

The Bowler hat (or Derby (United States); de. Melone; fr. Chapeau melon; it. Bombetta; nl. Bolhoed) is a headdress, a felt hat with a round crown, small, rounded brim, almost always black.

Flappers

Flappers are the ultra-trendy, fashionable, emancipated young women of the 1920s. These girls are the symbol of the Roaring Twenties. If we talk about the fashion of the 1920s, it is the flappers that personify this style.

Sailor suit

Sailor suit or Sailor dress is a style in children’s and women’s clothing with special details inspired by sailors. The sailor suit came into children’s fashion in 1846, when the son of the British Queen Victoria was given a “little sailor”

Suffragette

March 8 – International Women’s Day. It is based on suffragism, emancipation and various types of women’s struggle for rights. Under the name Suffragettes, we will bring together different types of women’s rights activists, although this applies to a greater extent to the history of the United States.

Garter

The Garter is a band worn to keep up a stocking, sock or chausses to the leg. Usually a garter is worn around the leg, but sometimes stockings are attached to other types of garments with garters (garter belt, corselet, sock braces, girdle, etc.).

Delphos gown

The Delphos gown is a finely pleated silk dress first created in about 1907 by French designer Henriette Negrin and her husband, Mariano Fortuny y Madrazo (1871–1949).

Little Black Dress

The Little Black Dress. (fr. La Petite robe noire) is a fashionable dress designed by Gabrielle Chanel in 1926. Many historians argue that before Chanel, only widows wore black and she revolutionized fashion.

Beach Pajamas

The Beach Pajamas are women’s summer leisure wear. Beach pajamas, which look like palazzo pants (wide-legged pants) with an attached sleeveless top, sometimes supplemented with a light robe or jacket.

Girdle

The Girdle is a form-fitting undergarment with garters. Distinguishes a Girdle from a Garter belt in that it is wide, reminiscent of a tight-fitting short skirt, hides the lower torso, extending below the hips, and worn often to shape or for support.

Tea gown

The Tea gown (also Tea dress) is type of lady’s home dress, loose-fitting dress, but sometimes belted. The lady wore a Tea gown at home, with her family and closest friends, but not for special occasions, for example, receiving guests or a dinner party.

Glasses

Types of glasses. The first eyeglasses were made in Northern Italy, most likely in Pisa, by about 1290 (or 1284). Initially, glasses were worn on the nose or held in the hand.